Monthly Archives: February 2015

Job Search Etiquette:

How To Change Jobs & Remain Professional

jobs-search-tips

Looking for a new job when you’re already employed can be a delicate balance. If you know that you’re ready to make a move there’s often a temptation to get out as soon as possible, particularly if you’ve run into any issues that are causing you to leave. However, burning bridges is never a good idea and when you’re changing jobs, the most important thing is to remain professional. Here are five tips for getting that changeover just right:

  1. Avoid talking negatively.

    When you’re going to interviews with other businesses, avoid talking negatively about the company that you’re leaving. Even if you’ve been badly treated, or you think the listening party might agree with you it doesn’t come across well to talk about hatred or dislike for the job that you’re leaving behind. Most employers will assume that they could also one day be on the receiving end of your vitriol and this will put them off.

 

  1. Don’t discuss your job search on social media.

    It can be very tempting to take to social media, to recount a funny interview or look for sympathy, in a particularly stressful situation but avoid it at all costs. Not only will this alert your current employer to the fact that you’re leaving, but it won’t impress a potential employer who could well be looking at your social media, as part of the interview process.

 

  1. Don’t carry out the job search at work.

    It’s bad etiquette to use work time that you’re being paid for, to look for another job. So, avoid browsing job search websites to look for other positions and definitely don’t start printing off CVs or filling out applications on your current boss’ time. This is not only unprofessional, but is the easiest way to alert your current employer to the fact that you’re looking around.

 

  1. Avoid confiding in colleagues about your job search.

    Work relationships are slightly unusual in that they often remain competitive, no matter how close you might become to those that you work with. It’s never a good idea to tell colleagues that you’re planning to leave as you might just end up confiding in someone who would benefit from passing this information on.

 

  1. Be professional once you’ve handed in your notice.

    You might be tempted to go a bit AWOL, once you’ve handed in your notice, but remember that you will need a reference from your current employer so you need to remain professional at all times. If you find yourself lacking in motivation, or feeling resentful about what might have happened in the past, then focus instead on the exciting new position and the bright future that you have ahead of you.

 

Author bio: Unity Recruitment are specialist recruiters, based in London, focusing on the highway and parking industry, commercial and general admin roles within large businesses. They have years of experience in guiding and advising candidates for a wide range of interviews.

Graduates – Kick start your career

Graduate RecruitmentGraduate Opportunities

You’ve graduated from university or are in the final year of your studies, you’ve completed or will graduate with a higher level qualification such as a BA or BSc honours degree. Now you’re searching the web for opportunities to kick start your career, what next? whats available?

There are various routes available for graduates to find employment:

Internships

Internships are placements offered by employers looking for potential employees. These opportunities are for a fixed and limited time anywhere from 4-12 weeks, some can last longer. Internship placements can be paid  or unpaid depending on their employment status classification; volunteer or employee. Internships are available to both  graduates and students.

Some key benefits of Internships include but not limited to:

  • Hands on practical work experience
  • Build on the skills you gained at university
  • Increase your confidence
  • Network and make contacts in your chosen industry
  • Find out if this is the right employer or industry for you
  • Gain a work reference and boost your chances of gaining future employment.

You can search internships at :

Graduate jobs

Graduate jobs also advertised as “Graduate Training Schemes” are paid employment contracts within public and private organisations. Employers create these privileged positions which incorporate structured training programmes that allow graduates to fast-track their careers and reach their full potential. Graduate recruitment programmes enable companies to bring fresh ideas to the table whilst nurturing future talent.

Graduate jobs are designed to take enthusiastic graduates and train them with the key skills required to become important employees in the business. Graduates are given the chance and time to learn the different areas of the business, they are assigned mentors who support and guide them through the journey. Some areas of business which graduates may be expected to job shadow are marketing, HR, IT, management, research and accounts. Some companies also offer industry specific qualifications and postgraduate qualifications such as ACCA, CIMA, CISCO, MCP and much more. The duration of a graduate scheme is dependent on the chosen role.

Most graduate scheme opportunities take place just after graduation between September and January, but don’t worry, you can still find plenty of graduate jobs during the rest of the year.

Here are some sites where you can search graduate jobs:

Self employment

An alternative to working for someone is to start up your own business, become your own boss and an entrepreneur. If you are someone who is creative and driven, wanting to bring your ideas to life, then this may be the perfect solution. Self employment is empowering and allows you to follow and realise your dreams.

There are various sources of funding available from government-backed business schemes to crowdfunding on the internet. Funding can be secured in the form of grants, loans, investments. You can approach business mentors who will give you an honest opinion on whether your business idea is viable or not.

If you have a skill rather than a product to sell, it is worth looking into freelancing, the perfect starting point would be websites such as:

These sites can be the first step into self employment, they allow you to source jobs online and create a portfolio to showcase your abilities and  work.

Don’t be afraid of failing, running a business will teach you an incredible amount about yourself and you will pick up a whole range of new skills to take forward in your career.

Any other jobs

If all else fails then take on any job or volunteer. Being employed is far better than being unemployed. It’s better for your health, well-being and CV. Use any job a stepping stone to a better future.

Good luck with your career