Tag Archives: career

How to utilise social media in your job search

If you have been relying on Google during your job search and have subsequently struggled to achieve any success, now is the time to try an alternative.

Social media has fast become a part of our everyday lives, which employers, job seekers and recruiters are also making full use of during the recruitment process.

Take a look at the guide below to find out how you should be using social media in order to help you land the job of your dreams.

Social Media Guide

#1 Show yourself off

Almost all employers look at Facebook and Twitter profiles before deciding on whether to interview or hire a candidate. It is important to show your personality and interests on the platforms, while also demonstrating your experience and knowledge. However, finding the right balance is crucial.

While you may love heading out on the town every week, this is something that employers don’t need to see. Think about what posts you would be happy to share with them and edit your privacy settings to prevent potential employers from viewing anything that could deter them from offering you a job or interview.

#2 Take social on the go

Make sure you download apps for the likes of LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter, and set up push notifications. This simple step will allow you to remain aware of any updates or messages from employers that you like or follow, and to keep you in the know of any new positions that become available.

Alternatively, use Tweetdeck so that you are alerted whenever a certain hashtag is used, for example #jobsearch.

#3 Make your personal brand unique

Turning your job search into your own personal brand can help to make your application stand out from the competition.

Begin by inventing a slogan. Think about those used by the likes of Nike and Gillette which get straight to the point and clearly explain what the brand is all about. Yours should be around 5 or 6 words, and work to sum up why you are an ideal candidate. Begin by conjuring up descriptive words that best describe you. Avoid cliché words or phrases such as those highlighted in the guide above. Once you are happy with the slogan, add it to your bio sections on each social platform.

#4 Become a professional for your passions

Blogging has become popular over the past few years, so much so that many employers find candidates with their own blogs far more appealing.

A blog can help you to demonstrate your great passion for your chosen industry, while providing you with something to discuss during interviews as well as a platform to showcases your expertise. The more time you invest in your blog, the more effective it will be. It is recommended that you update your blog at least once a week, with all new posts promoted via links on social platforms.

#5 Last but not least – be patient and don’t lose hope

Incorporating social media into your job search is an extremely effective tool to use during the process, but utilising these platforms to the best of their abilities takes time and effort. While it won’t happen overnight, using social media can help you to build relationships with employers and potential work peers that could last a lifetime.

Author Bio

Rachel Campbell is a content writer for BCL Legal, recruiters specialising in pairing legal candidates with ideal employers, be it in-house or as part of a law firm.

Exam Revision Tips For Students

 exam-tips

Exam revision tips

No matter what type of career you’re planning to have after you leave school or university you’ll have to know how to successfully achieve the qualifications you need. Not everyone is naturally good with exams, so for many of us it’s a matter of making the most out of the time we have to revise in order to attain the best possible grades. The truth is everyone is different and we flourish with different learning techniques. Good exam results can be the first step to a successful career. So here is our impartial exam revision tips for you.

#1: Make a Timetable

This might sound like a pretty basic tool, but when exam time is creeping up and stress levels are rising it is very useful to work out exactly how many hours you can fit in between now and the exam. Be realistic with your time and take into account breaks for meals and resting, if you’re over optimistic about how much studying you can fit in you are less likely to stick to the timetable.

#2: Eat and Drink Well

Revision time is not a time when you want to get sick or feel physically tired. Ensuring that you eat enough calories and stay hydrated sounds simple but many people can lose their appetite when they are stressed or forget to eat proper meals. If you live with friends or family (or other students) why not try taking in turns to organise meals for the household, even if you’re not hungry this will encourage you to think about food and remember to eat proper meals.

#3: Don’t Procrastinate

Yes it’s important to be organised when your revising but don’t spend too much time ‘getting ready to revise’ and not enough time actually learning. If you’re finding it hard to get out of a procrastination rut the best advice is just ask yourself to do one thing. For example, you need to read a book – start off by reading the first line then take it from there. Don’t think about the whole task, just the first step – once you make a start the rest won’t seem so bad anymore.

#4: Research the Exam

Ask your teacher or tutor about exam themes and if they have any tips. They will probably only be able to give you very limited information but it acts as good starting point for your revision. It is also a good technique to try to get hold of some past papers so that you can get as much practice as possible. These should be readily made available through your education provider or accessible online via the exam board website.

 

#5: Decompress – time out

You’ll probably find a lot of study guides that tell you to exercise when you are studying. Exercise is a great decompression technique if you enjoy exercising but a pain if you don’t. If you don’t want to exercise take some time out to decompress doing something you enjoy, preferably something that lets you move about if you have been sitting down all day.

#6: Bite-size chunks

Failing to plan is planning to fail;

A simple and effective technique is to breakdown your revision into smaller bite-size chunks, you can then plan these as revision sessions into your timetable. Rather than trying to revise everything all at once it is much easier to revise smaller manageable pieces.

How to write a cover letter

Cover Letter Made Easy – Simple 3 parts cover letter solution

Here is a simple solution to how to write a cover letter without over-complicating it.

A cover letter should be viewed as consisting of 3 parts:

1st Part – Introduction

  • Let the reader know why you are writing the letter
  • Doesn’t need to be long
  • 2 to 3 lines is enough

2nd Part – Explanation

  • Why you are suitable for the job.
  • How do you meet the the job spec and criteria
  • Can be more than one paragraph, two or three paragraphs is fine
  • Can use bullet points, easier to read
  • An explanation of how previous work and life experience, transferable skills and relevant qualifications make you the perfect candidate to fill the vacancy.

3rd Part – Closing statement

  • Thank the employer for the opportunity to apply
  • Availability of interview
  • 2 to 3 lines are enough

Read more about cover letters in our previous article cover letter advice article
Use our editable cover letter template to get you started

Summer Jobs

summer_jobs

Looking for Summer Jobs

If you are a student or school leaver you may be battling with whether or not to get a summer job. On the one hand, summer is a time for many students to kick back and enjoy travelling and spend time with friends. On the other hand, a summer job could prove to be a valuable work experience for the CV and step into the future. To help you consider the options, here are our top five benefits to Summer Jobs.

1. Income

Many people are motivated to take up work during the summer months because they want to earn a bit of extra cash. If you opting for a paid summer job, having an additional source of income can be a big bonus. Money earned during the summer could help support up-coming university costs or even act as a start-up capital for your own projects.

2. Skills

Whether you take a summer job working at a youth camp, cafe shop or an unpaid internship you will gain a wealth of skills and knowledge that you just can’t get at school or college. These skills will prove invaluable for whatever you decide to do after the summer. They could help you secure another job in the future and make you a more favourable applicant for universities.

3. Confidence

A summer job can be a valuable personal, as well as professional, experience. Putting yourself into a new environment with new challenges will demonstrate to yourself and others just how capable you are. If you have never had a job of any kind before, you will be surprised at how much you grow in confidence over the summer. Regardless of what kind of summer job you take you will gain increased independence and self-reliance.

4. Networking

Although you might be very popular and have many friends from school and college, chances are that you don’t regularly interact with a wide range of different people in a professional setting. A summer job will inevitably find you working and interacting with people who you would otherwise not have met. This can really help broaden your social awareness and help you to learn how to interact with other groups of people. This could prove particularly helpful when meeting new people at college or university, or when applying for jobs in the future.

5. Extra Credit

Many universities run Degree Plus, or similar programmes, that acknowledge and reward work experience gained by students outside of term time. Working in a summer job could count towards extra merit at university and formal recognition of skills and experience gained. It is worth checking with your university or college to find out more about Degree Plus, or their programmes, and to check what jobs are eligible.

The Bottom Line

Whatever you plan to do after the summer, working during this time could benefit you in more ways than you realise right now. It is, however, important to make sure that you get the right opportunity to suit you and to balance work with leisure during the summer.

 

Job Search Etiquette:

How To Change Jobs & Remain Professional

jobs-search-tips

Looking for a new job when you’re already employed can be a delicate balance. If you know that you’re ready to make a move there’s often a temptation to get out as soon as possible, particularly if you’ve run into any issues that are causing you to leave. However, burning bridges is never a good idea and when you’re changing jobs, the most important thing is to remain professional. Here are five tips for getting that changeover just right:

  1. Avoid talking negatively.

    When you’re going to interviews with other businesses, avoid talking negatively about the company that you’re leaving. Even if you’ve been badly treated, or you think the listening party might agree with you it doesn’t come across well to talk about hatred or dislike for the job that you’re leaving behind. Most employers will assume that they could also one day be on the receiving end of your vitriol and this will put them off.

 

  1. Don’t discuss your job search on social media.

    It can be very tempting to take to social media, to recount a funny interview or look for sympathy, in a particularly stressful situation but avoid it at all costs. Not only will this alert your current employer to the fact that you’re leaving, but it won’t impress a potential employer who could well be looking at your social media, as part of the interview process.

 

  1. Don’t carry out the job search at work.

    It’s bad etiquette to use work time that you’re being paid for, to look for another job. So, avoid browsing job search websites to look for other positions and definitely don’t start printing off CVs or filling out applications on your current boss’ time. This is not only unprofessional, but is the easiest way to alert your current employer to the fact that you’re looking around.

 

  1. Avoid confiding in colleagues about your job search.

    Work relationships are slightly unusual in that they often remain competitive, no matter how close you might become to those that you work with. It’s never a good idea to tell colleagues that you’re planning to leave as you might just end up confiding in someone who would benefit from passing this information on.

 

  1. Be professional once you’ve handed in your notice.

    You might be tempted to go a bit AWOL, once you’ve handed in your notice, but remember that you will need a reference from your current employer so you need to remain professional at all times. If you find yourself lacking in motivation, or feeling resentful about what might have happened in the past, then focus instead on the exciting new position and the bright future that you have ahead of you.

 

Author bio: Unity Recruitment are specialist recruiters, based in London, focusing on the highway and parking industry, commercial and general admin roles within large businesses. They have years of experience in guiding and advising candidates for a wide range of interviews.

Free SIA Course – Want to work in the Security Industry

security SIA course

The Security Industry Authority (SIA)

The Security Industry Authority (SIA) is the organisation responsible for regulating the private security industry in the UK. It is compulsory for individuals wanting a career in security to be approved and licensed to work within specific sectors of the private security industry.

You must be over 18 and have to pass a criminality check (DBS formerly known as CRB).

Two Types of SIA licence

There are two types of SIA licence:

  • Front line
  • Non Front line

More info at www.sia.homeoffice.gov.uk

Front Line – Door supervision course

The most popular course is the SIA accredited Door Supervisor which offers a huge number of employment opportunities across the country. Just by conducting a quick search on an online jobboard for security or SIA, you’ll receive hundreds of results.

Others courses include CCTV and Close Protection.

Free SIA Training

Templegate Training are an offering free SIA courses to anyone who is out of education and unemployed (over 19).

Is it really free?

Yes, we have contacted the company and they have assured us this is a free course which is offered as part of their “Back to work” support programme. There is some eligibility criteria you need to meet before you can enroll.

The course is open to anyone who is

  • Not in Education
  • Unemployed and not in any training
  • Over the age of 19 years
  • UK National or Resident (for 3 years or more)
  • Claiming benefits such as JSA, ESA or income support

The free security training course is held at various locations across the. Previous courses have been conducted at training centres in Blackpool, Burnley, Liverpool, Blackpool, Leyton, Derby and Bristol.

Good luck with your training